Some key readings to help understand and promote the quality of science in ecology and evolution

Key papers for an understanding of the replication crisis in ecology and evolution and a pathway to change

Forstmeier et al (2017) Detecting and avoiding likely false-positive findings – a practical guide. Biol. Rev. 92, 1941–1968 https://DOI:10.1177/0956797611417632

Fraser et al (2018) Questionable research practices in ecology and evolution PLOS ONE https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0200303

Ihle et al (2017) Striving for transparent and credible research: practical guidelines for behavioral ecologists.Behavioral Ecology (2017), 28(2), 348–354. https://doi:10.1093/beheco/arx003

Nelson et al (2018) Psychology’s Renaissance. Annu. Rev. Psychol. 2018. 69:511–34. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-psych-122216-011836

Parker et al (2018) Empowering peer reviewers with a checklist to improve transparency. Nature Ecol & Evol. 2, 929–935 https://doi.org/10.1038/s41559-018-0545-z

Parker et al (2016) Transparency in Ecology and Evolution: Real Problems, Real Solutions. TREE 31, 711  http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2016.07.002

Simmons et al (2011) False-Positive Psychology: Undisclosed Flexibility in Data Collection and Analysis Allows Presenting Anything as Significant. Psychological Science 22 1359–1366 https://DOI:10.1177/0956797611417632

Wang et al (2018) Irreproducible text-book “knowledge”: The effects of color bands on zebra finch fitness. Evolution https://doi:10.1111/evo.13459

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